Vanessa Jaiteh - Coral Reef Research Foundation
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Vanessa Jaiteh

About Vanessa

Growing up in the Swiss mountains, the ocean was a distant dream for me until I took my first gulp of Mediterranean seawater at age nine. I have since lived in Australia, Indonesia and Palau, where I have studied and worked on issues related to tropical fisheries and anthropogenic impacts on large marine predators, including fisheries bycatch, aerial and boat-based marine megafauna surveys, and shark fishing livelihoods.

Studying threatened, endangered and protected (TEP) species bycatch in a Western Australian trawl fishery for my Honours degree, I realised that the natural sciences alone didn’t provide the kinds of answers I was looking for. In my PhD I combined methods from the natural and social sciences to study the eastern Indonesian shark fishery, both from a fisheries science and a livelihoods perspective. My experiences in eastern Indonesia confirmed the benefits of combining different disciplinary approaches in my research, landing me on a continuing journey of exploring novel solutions to TEP management and conservation questions in the contexts of small-scale coastal and larger scale oceanic fisheries.

My current work includes the application of transdisciplinary approaches to assessments of data-poor fisheries, including IUU fisheries. Now based in Palau, I work on various consultancies throughout the Micronesia/SE Asia region. If you would like to discuss a potential collaboration or consultancy, please get in touch via the contact details below.

Contact details

Mail
Coral Reef Research Foundation
PO Box 1765
Koror, 96940
Republic of Palau

Email
vanessa.jaiteh@outlook.com

Skype
vanessa.flora.jaiteh

Phone
+680 488 5255 (Office)
+680 778 4140 (Mobile)

Publications and downloads

Vanessa’s publications can be found on her ResearchGate profile and on Academia. Please email for copies of papers that cannot be accessed from these links.

Original articles

  • Jaiteh V, Loneragan N and Warren C (2017) The end of shark finning? Impacts of declining catches and fin demand on coastal cumminity livelihoods. Marine Policy.
  • Jaiteh V, Hordyk A, Braccini M, Warren C and Loneragan N (2016) Shark finning in eastern Indonesia: assessing the sustainability of a data-poor fishery. ICES Journal of Marine Science. doi: 10.1093/icesjms/fsw170
  • Jaiteh V, Lindfield S, Mangubhai S, Warren C, Fitzpatrick B and Loneragan N (2016) Higher abundance of Marine Predators and changes in fishers’ behavior following spatial protection within the world’s biggest shark fishery. Frontiers in Marine Science. doi: 10.3389/fmars.2016.00043
  • Jaiteh V and Momigliano P (2015) New distribution records of the Vulnerable fossil shark Hemipristis elongata from eastern Indonesia call for improved fisheries management. Marine Biodiversity Records 8: e79
  • Momigliano P and Jaiteh V (2015) First records of the grey nurse shark Carcharias taurus (Lamniformes: Odontaspididae) from oceanic reefs in the Timor Sea. Marine Biodiversity Records 8: e56
  • Jaiteh V, Allen S, Meeuwig J and Loneragan N (2014) Combining in-trawl video with observer coverage improves understanding of protected and vulnerable species bycatch in trawl fisheries. Marine and Freshwater Research. Online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/MF13130
  • Jaiteh V, Allen S, Meeuwig J and Loneragan N (2013) Subsurface behavior of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) interacting with fish trawl nets in northwestern Australia: Implications for bycatch mitigation. Marine Mammal Science 29(3): E266-E281

Book chapter

  • Momigliano P, Jaiteh V and Speed C (2015) Predators in danger: Shark conservation and management in Australia, New Zealand, and their neighbours. In: Adam Stow, Gregory Holwell, Norman Maclean (eds). Austral Ark. Cambridge University Press.

Reports

  • Whitcraft S, Hofford A, Hilton P, O’Malley M, Jaiteh V and P. Knights. (2014) Evidence of Declines in Shark Fin Demand, China. WildAid. San Francisco, CA.

Conference Presentations

  • Jaiteh V, Lindfield S, Mangubhai S, Warren C, Fitzpatrick B and Loneragan N (2016) More sharks, less fins: Ecological successes and socio-economic challenges of spatial protection within the world’s biggest shark fishery. International Coral Reef Symposium, Honolulu, Hawai’I, July 2016
  • Jaiteh V, Hordyk A, Braccini M, Warren C and Loneragan N (2015) What’s the catch? Recent trends in the Eastern Indonesian shark fishery. Australian Society for Fish Biology Conference, Sydney, Australia, 12-16 October 2015
  • Jaiteh V, Warren C and Loneragan N (2014) Sharks, Sails and Smugglers: Fishing for new livelihoods in Eastern Indonesia. 2nd World Small-Scale Fisheries Congress, Merida, Mexico, 21-26 September 2014
  • Jaiteh V, Warren C and Loneragan N (2014) Building an understanding of the world’s biggest shark fishery through fishers’ knowledge and participation in scientific data collection. Sharks International, Durban, South Africa, 2-6 June 2014
  • Jaiteh V, Warren C and Loneragan N (2012) Predators as livelihoods: Shark fisheries in Eastern Indonesia. Australian Society for Fish Biology & Oceania Chondrichthyan Society, Adelaide, Australia, 15 – 18 June 2012
  • Jaiteh V, Allen S, Meeuwig J, Loneragan N (2011) Sub-surface behaviour of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) interacting with fish trawl nets in NW Australia. Australian Marine Sciences Association Conference, Fremantle, Western Australia.
  • Jaiteh V, Allen S, Meeuwig J, Loneragan N (2010) Interactions between dolphins and an Australian demersal scalefish trawl fishery: implications for bycatch mitigation. European Cetacean Society (ECS) Conference, Stralsund, Germany.

Sharks and Smugglers

Short Documentary, originally aired on ABC Australia

Declining catches, a reduction in the demand for shark fin and debilitating debt with their bosses have left many Indonesian shark fishers in search of a new livelihood. This short documentary investigates one such ‘diversification strategy’ of fishers in one of my study sites, providing insight into small-scale fishers’ susceptibility to external pressures, and shedding light on some common misperceptions about people smugglers.